2. VIDEO: Why do you care about GBS?

Group B Strep (GBS) Online Course

 

Graphic: Introduction To Group B Strep (GBS)

Jane Plumb, Chief Executive, Group B Strep Support

My name is Jane Plumb and I am Chief Exec of the charity Group B Strep Support.

Philip Steer, Professor Emeritus of Obstetrics, Imperial College London

I’m Philip Steer, Professor Emeritus of Obstetrics at Imperial College London.

Meghan Azad, Assistant Professor in Department of Pediatrics & Child Health, University of Manitoba

Meghan Azad, Assistant Professor at the University of Manitoba, Department of Pediatrics and Child Health and Research Scientist at the Children's Hosptial Research Institute of Manitoba.

Victor Nizet, Professor of Pediatrics and Pharmacy, University of California, San Diego

My name is Victor Nizet. I'm a Professor of Pediatrics and the vice-chair of research in our department. I'm also a Professor at the School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences right here at the University of California San Diego.

Anita Kozyrskyj, Professor in Pediatrics, University of Alberta

I’m Anita Kozyrskyj, Professor in Pediatrics at the University of Alberta.

 

Graphic: Why do you care about GBS?

Jane Plumb, Chief Executive, Group B Strep Support

I first became interested in group B Strep when my middle child died as a result of group B Strep infection when he was 17 hours old back in 1996.

Interviewer (off-screen): What has happened since?

Jane Plumb, Chief Executive, Group B Strep Support

Since then, we have set up a charity, Group B Strep Support, with the overarching objective of eradicating group B Strep infection particularly in newborn babies.

Philip Steer, Professor Emeritus of Obstetrics, Imperial College London

I first got interested in the issue and problem surrounding group B Streptococcus when I met Jane Plumb who currently runs the charity group B Strep support. She had a personal history of tragically losing a child from group B Strep and I was honoured to be able to look after her in a subsequent pregnancy. And that's where it all started.

Victor Nizet, Professor of Pediatrics and Pharmacy, University of California, San Diego

In our lab, we try to understand the mechanisms by which this pathogen, group B Streptococcus, or GBS, is able to fool the immune system and spread beyond the surfaces of the body, deeper into the body where it can produce severe disease. And in particular, we are studing the unique susceptibility of the newborn infant.

Anita Kozyrskyj, Professor in Pediatrics, University of Alberta

Our research to date from the Symbiota microbiome programme has focused on the most obvious exposures around birth and many of them could be termed medical interventionsbut we were particularly interested to see if prenatal exposures could have an impact on the development or composition of the gut microbiome in infants.

Meghan Azad, Assistant Professor in Department of Pediatrics & Child Health, University of Manitoba

Now that we know how important the microbiome is, it's being appreciated that the antibiotics given to mothers might have an unintended influence on their microbiome and their infants’ microbiome. So we're interested in finding out if there is an impact of this dose of antibiotics during childbirth on the infant microbiome.





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